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Darvas Box Theory – Tracking Uptrends

The Darvas box theory is based on the work of Nicolas Darvas, author of the book How I Made $2 Million in the Stock Market. This indicator uses his box theory to help visualize upward trends and find potential opportunities to buy or add to a position.

Darvas was a growth stock trader. After extensive study of historical stock movements, Darvas noted stocks “have a defined upward or downward trend which, once established, tended to continue. Within this trend stocks moved in a series of frames, or what I began to call boxes.

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Install the latest release of Darvas Box Theory – Tracking Uptrends indicator.

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Ants Indicator – Momentum, Volume and Price (MVP)

The Ants indicator for TradingView is based on the research of David Ryan, three-time winner of the U.S. Investing Championship. David came up with the idea for the indicator while managing the New USA Growth Fund at William O’Neil + Company. David was interested to understand what drove some stocks higher once they were extended from their most recent base, while others had only moderate moves up.

What David found during his research was that stocks making the biggest moves often had consistent buying on volume over a period of 12 to 15 trading days. Stocks with these characteristics may be under institutional accumulation, where it may take days to weeks to fill a position.

Free Trial: If you haven’t tried the TradingView charting app, you owe it to yourself to give their free trial a spin. You won’t regret it!

Here’s where you can find the latest release of Ants — Momentum, Volume and Price (MVP)

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Moving Averages for All Timeframes From within One Indicator

Manage moving averages, for all timeframes, from within one indicator.

Features:
■ Intraday – Up to 3 moving averages
■ Daily – Up to 4 moving averages
■ Weekly – Up to 2 moving averages
■ Monthly – Up to 2 moving averages
■ Choose between simple, exponential or volume weighted moving averages (SMA, EMA or VWMA)

Free Trial: If you haven’t tried the TradingView charting app, you owe it to yourself to give their free trial a spin. You won’t regret it!

Here’s where you can find the latest release of the Moving Averages for All Timeframes.

Volume Positive Negative (VPN) Indicator

The idea and calculations for the Volume Positive Negative (VPN) indicator were created by Markos Katsanos. Markos wrote about the indicator in the article Detecting High-Volume Breakouts, published in Technical Analysis of Stocks & Commodities April, 2021 (Vol. 39, Issue 5).

The goal of the VPN indicator is to detect breakouts using only volume. The basic idea is to compare volume on up days versus volume on down days. The oscillator can move between the range of -100 and 100. Values between 0 and 20 are generally considered bullish, negative are bearish.

When the plotted VPN crosses over what Markos refers to as the critical value, that may indicate a high volume breakout. The critical value can be adjusted between 0 to 20, 10 is the default,

Free Trial: If you haven’t tried the TradingView charting app, you owe it to yourself to give their free trial a spin. You won’t regret it!

Here’s where you can find the latest release of the Volume Positive Negative (VPN) indicator.

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TradingView – Divide a Watchlist into Sections

The original post below on creating sections within a TradingView watchlist was based on what I thought was an undocumented feature, something I found by accident when entering a symbol name incorrectly in a file to be imported.

I’ve since learned that there is actually an option within TradingView: How to add a section to the watchlist. Thanks @calib3r1 for the heads up.

If you create a list within TradingView and add sections as outlined in the link, upon exporting the list you’ll find that the separator is designated using “###NameHere”

To duplicate the list shown in the original post below, using the # separator, create and import a text file with the following contents:

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Volume Indicator with Customizable Moving Averages

This TradingView indicator displays volume based on the current timeframe. For example, on a daily chart the volume represents the volume for the day. On a weekly chart, the volume is cumulative for the week.

There is also an option to configure the volume moving average lengths. The default for a daily chart is to calculate the 50-day moving average. On a weekly chart, the default is the 10-week moving average.

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Price Stats Indicator Similar to MarketSmith

The “Track Price” information available in MarketSmith (aka the yellow box) is quite helpful to get specifics on price and volume action. I wrote a similar indicator for TradingView that you can use to keep tabs on the same information.

Here’s how the track price information is shown on MarketSmith:

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Wilder’s RSI Oscillator, Revisited and Updated

New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems, originally published in 1978 by J. Welles Wilder, is an excellent book to dig into technical analysis. One of Wilder’s most well known indicators is the Relative Strength Index (RSI).

The RSI is an oscillator that measures the velocity of directional price movement. When it moves up very quickly, eventually it will be considered overbought, the opposite for oversold. In these scenarios, a reversal may be forthcoming. In addition, the RSI is often used to view areas of divergences.

Here’s how Wilder defined the RSI:

RS = Average of 14 day’s closes up / Average of 14 day’s closes down

RSI = 100 – (100 / 1 + RS)

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